False friends

False friends or faux amis1 are words in two or more languages that look or sound similar, but differ significantly in meaning. For example, the word fear refers to an emotion in English, while in Irish it means “man”.

Selections

False friends in Irish:

beach
a bee
bean
a woman
crap
to contract, to draw in or up
dear
to draw, to design
fear
a man
file
a poet
focal
a word
gin
birth; to conceive
long
a ship
mall
slow
oil
to nurture, to educate
poll
a hole
rang
a rank
seas
to stand
sin
that, those
teach
a house
tit
to fall

False friends in French:

affluence
crowds, abundance
allure
appearance; speed, pace
but
aim, goal
fin
end, finish; thin, fine
glands
acorns
sensible
sensitive
  1. The origin of the term false friend is the French expression faux amis du traducteur [false friends of the translator].